|all article|Activation|brand|Jerseys|Lacoste|Mall|outlet|Product|Professional|Ralph Lauren|Shopping|swiss watch| login
|not set\Activation\Red Bottom Shoes Sale

Red Bottom Shoes Sale

auther: date:2013-07-07
sources:http://www.irishharpschool.com/2004/

´╗┐Can Serotonin Increase Peristalsis The gastrointestinal tract is the only system in your body that will continue to demonstrate neuronal activity and reflexes after being isolated from the central nervous system.Red Bottom Shoes Sale This is possible because the gut is hardwired with its own network of motility neurons known as the "enteric nervous system. " Your gastrointestinal tract is designed to function in a completely autonomous fashion; to achieve this goal, motor and sensory neurons work together to generate peristaltic reflexes that initiate waves of smooth muscle contraction, which carry the contents of your gut through the different phases of digestion. Serotonin plays a critical role in the process and has been linked to several gastrointestinal conditions including irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhea and constipation. PeristalsisTo ensure uni-directional transport of gastrointestinal contents, your enteric nervous system, coordinates a series of muscle contractions known as "peristalsis. " These wave-like contractions move food through the different sections of your digestive tract in an organized, tightly regulated fashion. This process begins with the stimulation of sensory neurons in the gut by the presence of food; these signals are processed by the ENS and fed back into motor neurons in the walls of your gut. Smooth muscle cells are then stimulated to contract, thus propelling the food bolus forward for further digestion and nutrient absorption. The Role of Serotonin in PeristalsisAccording to Dr. Michael Gershon of Columbia University, specialized sensory cells lining the wall of the GI tract, known as "enterochromaffin cells, " initiate the peristaltic reflex through the production and secretion of serotonin. This single neurotransmitter has a demonstrable role in generating waves of peristalsis through its action on serotonin receptors in the ENS. For instance, 5-HT4 receptors, which are located on presynaptic nerve terminals, are known to modify neurotransmitter release and facilitate the process of peristalsis. Irritable Bowel SyndromeCommonly referred to as IBS, Irritable Bowel Syndrome is a disorder characterized by abdominal pain, cramping and changes in bowel movements. The severity of this condition varies widely, from mild to severe diarrhea and/or constipation, in some cases switching between both of these symptoms. According to research published in the journal "Gastroenterology" in 2004, defects in serotonin pathways of the gut have been associated with GI diseases including IBS. The data shows that patients afflicted by these conditions share defects in serotonin-signaling pathways; specifically, the enzymes for producing and secreting serotonin were significantly reduced in these cases. Clinical ApplicationsTherapeutic agents targeting serotonergic pathways of have been successfully implemented in the treatment of IBS. Tegaserod, a serotonin agonist has been used in cases of IBS-induced constipation; this drug evidently works by mimicking the action of serotonin, which facilitates the generation of peristaltic waves, thus relieving the patient of constipation. Alosetron, on the other hand, is a serotonin antagonist and therefore inhibits the action of serotonin; this drug has been used in patients with IBS-induced diarrhea. By inhibiting the serotonergic pathways in the gut, the excessive peristalsis associated with diarrhea is reversed, relieving the patient of these symptoms. It should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. LIVESTRONG is a registered trademark of the LIVESTRONG Foundation. Moreover, we do not select every advertiser or advertisement that appears on the web site-many of the advertisements are served by third party advertising companies. 

not set
res://mshtml.dll/about.moz
this article reads 452 times
@ hotarticle

@ relearticle


copyrightall:not set time: 63 ms